Madonna Boobs!!

Quite often, Midnight Costume Services will be asked to create ‘runs’ of Costuming for various Production Companies, Theatre Productions and the like. Earlier this year we worked with Costume World to create multiple Madonna Cone Corsets. All identical, but in different sizes, from glittery sequin fabric ans stretch velvet. If I say so myself, they looked pretty spectacular!

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Specifications from the Production Company included a zip front, no lacing, matching pants and for them to be as stretchy as possible! We were’nt told what they were for (so obviously Beyonce’s backing singers… right?!) but they all had to match but be made in various sizes.

I created the Patterns- cone boobs are pretty awkward, and we had a phase where they were super wonky and pointed in different directions!- then graded them to make the different sizes. We made a toile that got okay-ed by the production company, then got to stitching!

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The cups were created with layers of Calico, Coutil, Wadding, Sequin and Lining, then sewn all about in a spiral. I wanted to make sure they retained their shape but- because we didn’t know what the Performers were going to do (we don’t want no-one stabbing Beyonce in the eye now, do we?)- I also wanted to make sure they were crushable.

Like I say, I was super happy with the result. My team and I created something I think Madge would be proud of!

Happy stitching!

 

Hail to the King!

Midnight Costume Services is finally at the end of a long run of Costumes for an Entertainment Park, and this job comes to a close with a Panto! Dick Whittington… and I thought I’d share the process of making some of the pieces, like King Rats Tail Coat!

Easily my favorite Costume to make so far, I decided to loosely Hand Tailor the Tailcoat to support a couple of incredibly dramatic Shoulder Pads. To get the right look I played about with layering existing Shoulder Pads and felt but in the end- even though it was more work- I had to resort to a more traditional technique and ended up layering the felt in decreasing sizes to build up a pointed, exaggerated Shoulder. As you can see in the first picture using the existing Shoulder Pads looked super clunky!

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Using a mixture of hand stitching, machine stitching and a little bit of glue, each Shoulder Pad has about 20 layers of felt and is quite malleable, allowing me to gently sculpt a curve. I haven’t some this in a while and I was super pleased with the results!

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I found some (pretty disgusting, but amazing for the purpose!) quilted fabric which I thought looked a little like Bin Bags… it’s the kinda thing I thought the King of Rats’ would have a tailored jacket out of!! In a concession to the performers I created the sleeves from a stretch Leather- which is why they look a little like they’re pulling- but means the Jacket will fit multiple performers and wont restrict movement.

The mannequin this is pictured on is a little too large, but I think it still looks majestic!

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I find Panto a difficult beast to design for, I want to do character analysis to find their motivation and design around that, which doesn’t really work here. It’s all a bit too tongue in cheek, shiny and primary coloured for me but in starting with King Rat I helped myself a lot! Deciding that as a character he would have had quilted and embroidered bin bags fashioned in to a Tailcoat got me on my way.

I also fashioned medals and ribbons for the lapel, because of course he would be decorated!, and used lace and matt black sequins to applique and embroider detailing in the lapel and jacket. With a final sprinkling of darkly glittery hot stones and a Top Hat I think he turned out to be quite the dandy!

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The hat was hand stitched and created using strips and fragments from the Tail Coat machine embroidered on, with layers of sparkly net and sequins overlayed. Slightly battered- he does live in the sewers after all!-the ears were made from faux fur, a lot of dye and sprayed dye.

As I have a commission to create a White and Gold Louis XVI Sun King Tail Coat I am really pleased this turned out so well. The Sun King Tail Coat will have to be much more viciously tailored to create a base for a spectacular Gold Feathered Shoulder Piece, and I can’t wait to share it!!

Happy stitching!

A little of what’s been happening…

Well, ever since Laura After Midnight changed and adapted to become Midnight Costume Services and I returned to my roots Designing and Making Costumes for Stage and Screen we have been run off our feet! My little team is gradually growing and I just got back off of my first Holiday in years to Paris… but more on that delicious adventure later!

Since Christmas we have been building Costumes for a Holiday Park including mini versions of over 15 West End and Film Musicals, dream job, right?! We were also commissioned to make 8 matching Madonna Cone Bra Corsets for some Dancers, worked on an awesome Victorian BBC TV Show and completed more work for Celebrity Cruises on three more Cruise Shows and that’s not everything… phew ‘eckers!

I’m going to be sharing more over the coming weeks as I slowly get back in to this blogging lark- it’s been nose to the grindstone a bit, with 12 hour days, 7 days a week and I do hope you can understand why I haven’t been sharing the love on here so much recently- but I thought I would start with the Anna and Elsa Costumes I shipped this Thursday… because they are a treat!!

We used the Yaya Han Corset as previously talked about for the base for all three Frozen Dresses because we knew it fitted the performers really well. It also gives a great foundation to be built upon. All skirts and Cloaks were then hand drafted to measure. The most work went into the Elsa Snowflake Dress, which took three of us about 4 days to build so I thought I’d share the process…

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The Corset for the Elsa Snowflake Dress has been made from 4 layers of fabric to build up the look I wanted. In the animation it’s actually illustrated as if it’s layers of square sequins however; anything like that that I tried to replicate was either too expensive (budget for this dress was about £100) or just didn’t move enough on stage and looked ‘clunky’ so the decision was made to emphasis the Snowflake aspect, which I think really worked.

About 200 Snowflakes were hot knifed from the Crystal Organza to use on the Silver Glitter Body Suit, the Corset and the Cloak.

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Once I started sewing the Corset together I had to get it on the mannequin almost immediately to see how it looked! It’s not often I get this excited as there’s a lot of prep that goes in to a Costume so I normally have a good idea of how it’s going to look… but this was different! The layers of Organza and Satin looked amazing once they were sewn! I also started to play around with the placement of the Snowflakes at the neckline. Super exciting!!

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Once the Corset was sewn properly, the Snowflakes were attached, and then Hot Stoned with Diamante Hot Stones, which really made the whole thing shimmer.

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The neckline of the Silver Glitter Body Suit was also strewn with Snowflakes and then Hot Stones, as you can see from the far left and 2nd left pictures above the Diamante Hot Stones really make the whole thing sparkle.

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The final costume was gorgeous however; because of the tight deadline we don’t have too many pictures. We shall hopefully be rectifying this soon, as we hope to soon see the costumes in action.

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As you can probably tell, I have tried to simplify the design of these Costumes. This is due in part to budget and time constraints however; it is also because I believe there is a risk in over embellishing Disney Costumes. Often the simpler they are, the more like the cartoon they look.

Above is Elsa’s 1st Dress, which has been colour blocked with the design hand painted to the front of the Corset. The thing I’m most pleased about? The Cloak!!

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And last, but not least, Anna. I love the simplicity of this dress. Love it! I think the green stripes of the Skirt work wonderfully, and in person the hand painting on the Black Velvet Corset kinda glows, it’s a shame it’s not showing up so well in the photos.

Hope you’ve enjoyed this glimpse into my fairy-tale world!

Happy stitching!

Lovely new dresses!

 

Introducing a small selection from the forthcoming range of Dresses I have been working on here at The Midnight Atelier!

The first is a lovely, light cotton Dress with a Scalloped Neckline both Back and Front, and gathered skirt. The bodice is fully lined, and this can be made up in any size, colour or pattern! I can’t wait to show you one made up in a plainer fabric as the Bodice has a beautiful Fan Dart detail… this look especially beautiful with a petticoat, which will also be available soon.

I think this look would be stunning for a group of Bridesmaids, in matching or different colours!

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Next up is this really scrumptious take on a Wiggle Dress! With it’s Fan Bust Darts, beautiful scooped V-Neck and Tulip Skirt this is a truly stunning dress. I have used the last of my Navy Cherry print for this, and can only lament I didn’t have enough to make it in my size!

This style too can be made in any colour, size or pattern- and looks great on a fuller figure!

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Lastly, is this stunning 60’s inspired Cocktail Dress made from Duchess Satin and Polka Dot Net. Fully lined and Interlined with Net- so the Tulip Skirt holds it’s shape beautifully- this dress is really lovely.

Hand finished with a row of Stab Stitched across the front, the Polka Dot Net has been backed for strength but is still see-through, and dips very attractively at the back!

This style best suits Satins and Silks however it too can be made in any size or colour.

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I shall be premièring the full collection soon however; orders are being taken now. Please do not hesitate to contact me… laura@lauraaftermidnight.com.

Don’t forget to add yourself to the Newsletter for news on my Open Studio, Bristol Sewing Club, new products and Markets!

Happy stitching!

Notes from the Atelier

This week has been a week filled with ups and downs. Renting and moving in to Midnight Atelier has been filled with mixed blessings! Yes, it is something which I have wanted to be able to do for many years now however; doing it has meant I have to suddenly make a lot more money, more consistently- something which this business is not known for!

I am in the process of drawing up a revised business plan for the next year or so, which is a wonderful way to organize thoughts and narrow down your scope- I have no problem dreaming big!- and out of the somewhat nervous depression is starting to come a spark of excitement. This could work!

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For the most part this week I have been preparing for a couple of Summer Vintage Markets, this first of which is in a week hosted by Gimme Shelter! Vintage Boutique at The Lanes in Bristol on Sunday 6th July 12-5pm.

I have been making up some of my best sellers- Bunting and Bunnies!- for what promises to be a very cheerful stall filled with my Vintage inspired Sewing Kits, new style Kilner Pin Cushion Jars, Appliqué Cushions and all sorts of other goodies! The above shows a fraction of the Bunting… I have been making up enough (hopefully) for a fair few markets and what you’re looking at it about 80 meters worth! Eek!!

I have also been receiving some pretty exciting post here at The Midnight Atelier! My Mum and Dad sent me an essential box of Lady Grey Tea- it’s so delicious, and Sewing Club are very appreciative!- and a super pretty Cup and Saucer (which I think my Dad picked out!). There was a HUGE box of biscuits as well but I am going to be honest and confess they have not made it here yet… we are enjoying them too much at home!

I also received a lovely couple of 1935 and 1937 Singer Needlework Samples Books from an Aunt, with two beautiful Edwardian Photos. I have already framed the photograph of the Lady sitting, and she has already starred in a photo shoot for my little Sewing Workshop!

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The other piece of post was this little package, sent from the Bunnies who have moved in to my Fells’s Sisters field… they are all called Jeff and we often hear from them but I had to share this delightful little package! It’s a little piece of art really…

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Apart from preping for the Markets I have also been hard at it creating more Corsets, which will be on sale soon.

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I am head over heels in love with the Red Satin one, and as you can see have found some pretty inventive ways to cut out!

Happy stitching!

Week III: Sewing the Eventide Corset up

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Today I will be starting to actually sew the Eventide Corset up! Yay!! There’s so many little preparation tasks in Corsetry that actually sitting down and stitching can be a long time coming!

A few notes first, on the order of Sewing. What I have designed the Eventide to be is an excellent easy Corset to stitch up, whether you are a beginner, want a quick make or just want to explore a different part of sewing. Because of this, the Eventide is sewn together in a very specific way- the Seams are stitched, then fitted and then adjusted as needed and finally the Boning Channels are sewn either side of the Seams. Normally, the corset would be tacked together temporarily at this stage, fitted and then sewn together properly with internal Boning Channels. This is still possible with the Eventide pattern however; you will need to decide how you would like to stitch the Corset together at this stage. If you are unsure and this is your first Corset, I would recommend sticking with the Eventide method for your first try, and then attempting something a little flashier on your next Corset. If you would like to keep all options open, simply at this stage sew the Fabric and Coutil panels together as illustrated, fit and then decide later!

It is popular assumption, amongst my classes, that inserting the Busk is the most difficult task when assembling a Corset. Whilst this needs precision however; I think that it is in fact the Seaming which can be more troublesome as you are stitching together many different curves, whilst maintaining a Seam Allowance and trying not to stitch anything which shouldn’t be!

Once this is done, you can begin the Fitting process, which is exciting and tends to make students rush this bit… please do not be tempted! If rushed, you may have to unpick and if using a Silk, Lace or more delicate fabric you stand to damage it.  The seaming needs to be precise and rushing can cause less than smooth lines to be stitched which, when the Corset is worn, will pull and stretch the Fabric in an unsightly way.

So, further dire warnings aside, let’s start stitching!

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To sew the Corset together using the Eventide method, you will need to lay all of the panels out in front of you, with the Front panels in the middle. They need to be Wrong Sides Together as illustrated (below left).

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Remember those Waist Line snips I was talking about last week? This is where you will need them, and if you forgot, snip them now!

With Right Sides Together, match the Waist Line snips of the Front and Side Front panels of the Fabric (above, Centre). Pin at this point, then continue to Pin up and down the seam as illustrated. Smooth out as you Pin and concentrate on matching the edge of the Fabric. To do this you will need to Pin every few centimetres (above right).

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Sew, with a 1.5cm Seam Allowance, along the pinned seam. Remember to reverse stitch at the beginning and end. Slow as you come to the Waist Line, as it is more curved and you may need to stop and start as you sew.

Continue by matching the Side Front and Side panels, then Side and Side Back and stitching all with a 1.5cm Seam Allowance until all panels are sewn in a line.

Repeat for the Coutil panels and then the other side of the Corset. You will notice (above right) that the Corset will very quickly start to take shape and begin to curve.

Of course, if you have the ability, or are wanting to sew quickly, pinning all of the Seams for the Fabric and Coutil for both sides, and then sewing them is an awful lot quicker than pinning and sewing individually. In fact, I do not pin at all! This increases my speed and efficiency and this technique is something I will be covering in more depth in my Video Series The Corset Sessions.

The Boning Channels will be sewn once the entire Corset has been stitched together, and fitted. Using the Eventide method, you are still able to get back in to the Corset seams whilst not unpicking anything which isn’t extremely necessary however; this will all be explained in further posts next week and I think that’s enough for today, lets all grab a cup of tea, step back and admire our handiwork, and have a little rest before making up out eyelet strips and preparing to Fit the Eventide Corset tomorrow!

Happy stitching!

Week III: Corset making resources

In writing and sewing for Corset Month, I have stumbled across a couple other websites which have some handy notes on creating Corsetry and further corset making resources. There are a myriad of ways to create a bespoke Corset, especially if you are unfettered by historical restraints, and these websites will illustrate both that and how to execute some of them.

As ever, there aren’t many! Corsetry is a very secretive art form it would seem but then this is why I have developed the Eventide Corset Pattern!

Foundations Revealed

Figure 29: The final corset, front.   Figure 30: The final corset, back

A fabulous resource, many of their articles you have to subscribe for (which I highly recommend if you want to continue creating bespoke corsetry, and particularly if you are interested in creating Historical Corsets) however; there are a couple free Corset making articles including this one from Sparklewren. Included are all of her helpful tips to sew clean lines, and some interesting hints including a neat little trick with Bias Binding. There are also links through out to other free articles including how to Draft your own Corset Pattern, tipping Boning and Dyeing your Coutil.

Steam Ingenious

Steam Ingenious have a whole host of Corsetry resources, which are from a more Costuming, Steampunk perspective which is really great to read through. Tutorials include Drafting, and Making Up as well as separate tutorials on Inserting Eyelets and using non-traditional Fabric and a fab list of other resources. It’s a great read, and I think presents the reader with a lot of alternatives which, as a Costumer I am more than aware of, but the home sewer or beginner will find fascinating. It is also great to read about someone learning and sharing all of these techniques!

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Black Low-Hipped Underbust - Quarter Front View, by Sidney Eileen

This thorough Corset Construction post on how to make a Basic two layer Coutil Corset is often spoken of and I think I learnt about it from Steam Ingenious. It is a very thorough Tutorial and well worth a read. Because it has been around for a little while, the comments make an interesting read too. Many of the techniques can be used for Sewing up the Eventide if you would like a different look.

I hope you enjoy as much as I did giving these varied resources a good read! As ever, don’t forget that you can share your Eventides‘ on Facebook and Twitter, as well as finding inspiration for your creation on Pinterest.

Happy stitching!

Week 2: Cutting the Eventide Corset out

Now, after a week of taking it easy it’s time to get stitching your Eventide Corset!

After having made any adaptations to fit on the Pattern, you’ll need to cut out the Fabric. Diagrams and more information can be found in the Eventide Instruction Book however; here are a couple of hints… … and dire warnings!

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After having traced off, adapted and cut out the Pattern, pin to the Fabric remembering to measure the Grain Line. Fold the Coutil in half, Selvedge to Selvedge and Right Sides Together (so you are pinning to the back of your Fabric), and lay it on a flat surface.

It is incredibly important that each piece of the Pattern is cut out ON GRAIN. The Grain runs parallel to the Selvedge, which is the woven, finished edge of the Fabric. Cross Grain, or Bias, runs at a 45 degree angle to the straight Grain. Corsets must be cut out DIRECTLY ON THE STRAIGHT GRAIN to ensure the Waist Line in particular maintains the strength provided by the Straight Grain. Cutting the pieces of the Corset even slightly ‘off grain’ will mean it will twist uncomfortably as you wear it.

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Now, dire warnings aside!, after you have pinned each Pattern piece you will need to draw on your Seam Allowance… which is 1.5cm.

To do this, use a Tape Measure to measure out 1.5cm from the Pattern piece, and mark with some Tailors Chalk or a Fabric Pencil in a contrast colour. As you can see, Tailors Chalk is available in a variety of colours and it is useful to have a selection. Continue around each Pattern piece, measuring out and making a mark every few centimetres or so. Use a ruler or Patternmaster to connect the dots.

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Cut each piece out, and before you un-pin it, make a little snip no more then 1cm deep at the Waist Line. This is called a notch and will assist you in sewing the Corset up. It is another important little detail!

Repeat for the Coutil.

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You may have noticed that each piece looks similar to the next, and you can choose to cut out some paper markers to Pin on to each piece. To do this simply write what the piece is on a little scrap of paper and pin to the piece BUT pin to the piece as you would WEAR it. To do this, lay the pieces out upside down so the top is closest to you.

And that’s it!

Don’t forget, the Eventide Corset Pattern is available in a number of options including Instant Download here, and you can join in with Corset Month on FacebookTwitter (#corsetsessions) and Pinterest!

Happy stitching!

Notions: Preparing to Sew with Difficult Fabric

For this weeks’ Notions, I thought I would discuss something which, whilst being relevant to Corsetry, is also good basic knowledge for using unusual fabrics for all types of projects.

There comes a time when we all would like to use something a little more adventurous! Preparing the Fabric well is half the task of sewing Lace, or Sequinned Fabric.

Lace Overlays

When using Lace for Corsets, you will need to consider the pattern of the Lace- is it large or small and do you need to take this into consideration when placing the Pattern Pieces? You will need to re-trace off your Corset Pattern (from your adapted Pattern) and add in Seam Allowance before cutting out. This will ensure you do not have to draw the Seam Allowance on to the Lace which can be difficult for a number of reasons- the Lace will move about and can stretch out of shape, it will also be delicate and should not be overly handled.

After tracing the Paper Pattern off, pin the Paper Pattern on and cut out as you would Fabric. If the lace is very delicate, you may wish to use Pattern Weights instead of Pins to ensure you do not damage the Lace. I do not worry about being overly accurate- as long as the Lace is cut out within 1cm of the edge of the Paper Pattern and all Waist Notches are marked you will be fine.

Once all Lace sections are cut out, lay the Fabric pieces of the Corset out, then lay the Lace sections on top. Double check your Waist Notches are all in line throughout the Corset pieces, and that you have a left and a right of each piece.

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Pin the layers together, pin carefully so as to not damage the Lace.

Tack each section together as illustrated. Use a contrast Tacking Thread, and try to keep within the 1.5cm Seam Allowance so you will not have to remove it. If, when the Corset is sewn up, you can see the Tacking Stitches, the contrast thread will help you to see where to remove them.

Once the pieces are tacked, you can trim back any excess Lace to the edge of the Fabric.

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Alternatively, and you may wish to Sew a couple Corsets having tacked them before trying this method!- you can pin the sections together as illustrated. Pin along the Seam Allowance as shown, and keep the Pins in until they are stitched up. Of course, whilst this method is quicker there are some obvious drawbacks! If you have to adjust the Corset or unpick it for any reason, these pieces will become separated and need to be pinned again, it will take a little more experience to be able to control the layers of fabric with just pins holding them together… you also use a lot of pins!!

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This is a technique I often use when manufacturing multiple Corsets.

Sequinned and Beaded Fabrics

Sewing with Sequinned and Beaded fabrics has another set of rules. Because you are unable to Sew over Beads or heavier weight Sequins, you will need to remove them from the Seam Allowance.

It is easiest to trace off the Pattern, and add the Seam Allowance as for working with Lace Fabrics before pinning in the Pattern and cutting out.

Using a Tape Measure, measure in 1.5cm (which is the Seam Allowance for the Eventide Corset Pattern) and mark with a line of Pins as illustrated.

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With a contrast Thread, tack along the line of Pins.

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When you have tacked a line of stitching 1.5cm in, you will need to remove all of the Beads and Sequins from the Seam Allowance. And yes, this takes ages!! I keep the Beads and Sequins I remove, in case I need to add a couple in again. The stitching which holds on the Beads or Sequins is actually a chain so sometimes a couple of centimetres can unravel when it is cut, and will need to be carefully sewn back down, or added in by hand.

I will insert the Busk by hand if I am making a Corset from Beaded Fabric so as to not disturb the pattern of the Beading at the front of the Corset.

Pattern Matching and using Patterned Fabrics

This tip for Pattern Matching Fabrics is enormously helpful however; if you are using a Patterned Fabric you may wish to select the sections you wish to use, or even Pattern Match the Front Panels so that the Pattern runs across them. This isn’t too difficult BUT please do try to remember to cut out a LEFT and a RIGHT of each Panel!! For this you will need to flip the Pattern Piece over.

pattern matchAs illustrated above, I have chosen which piece of the Pattern I would like to run down the front of the Corset. Folding the Pattern Piece back along the Centre Front line, I have matched it so that- when the Corset is sewn together- the Cyclist will pedal across the Bust!

Remember to fold the Pattern Back along the Centre Front line, then match on the Fabric. As you Pin the Pattern Piece on to the Fabric you can un-fold it and pin it down.

Matching along the Centre Front line is incredibly important because- and you’ll see this from the Instruction Book– the Fabric beyond the Centre Front is used as a Seam Allowance when inserting the Busk, so any pattern will be lost.

By the way, this awesome Fabric is available from Spoonflower, and I may just have to snap up a bit!

Don’t forget, the Eventide Corset Pattern is available in a number of options including Instant Download here, and you can join in with Corset Month on FacebookTwitter (#corsetsessions) and Pinterest!

Happy stitching!

Week 1: Adjusting the Eventide Corset Pattern to Fit

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Detailed instructions are given in the Eventide Corset Instruction Book however; I’d like to expand them a little with this Re-sizing Patterns to Fit post.

Although I am obviously doing this for the Eventide Corset Pattern, the basic principles apply when adjusting all Patterns to Fit your figure. I will admit that this technique will only get you so far, and would like to stress that a Fitting it always a good idea (unless you have a decade of experience like me!). A fitting will iron out all of the teeny tiny details and make any garment look oodles better however; the first step is to alter your Pattern to get a better approximation of your body than we currently have.

Firstly, take accurate measurements of your Bust, Waist and Hips and make a note of them. Reduce the measurements according to the instructions (roughly 10cm, but this is explained in greater detail in the Instruction Book), and make a note of this also.

With the reduced set of measurements, decide which Size is closest to yours. For example, the reduced measurements I am going to be working with are Bust 114cm, Waist 89cm and Hips 122cm which are closest to a Medium Size of the Eventide Corset Pattern. 

Once decided, cut or trace off the Size you wish to make (tracing off ensures you can re-use the Pattern, or have it to refer to if you make any mistakes).

Now the Maths bit… and yes, I heard you groan!

You will need to decide how much you need to add or take away from the Pattern to make it fit you, and in which areas. To do this you will need to subtract the Corset Pattern measurements from yours, then divide them in half. For example… my Bust measurement is 114cm which is 7cm larger than the Pattern Divided in half this is 3.5cm, which is what I need to add in to the Pattern to make it fit.

Repeat for the Waist and Hip measurements. I now know at this point that I need to add in 3.5cm to the Bust, 3cm to the Waist and 5cm to the Hips. You may be asking why we are further complicating things by dividing everything in half… this is because we will be working from the Pattern which is only half of you!

After all this Maths, you will need to start altering the Pattern. Again, there are complete instructions in the Eventide Corset Book however, this should explain things further.

Firstly, I lay all of the Pattern Pieces out in a line, with the Waist Line running parallel. I find this helps me visualize a little better what I am doing. Then, I make a note of where I would like to do the adjustments:adjust 1Normally, I would steer clear of adjusting the Front and Side Front Panels however, as I am making this Corset for a curvier Woman, I’d like to add in a little more room. They are also the narrowest Panels and I’d like to even this out a little for this Corset. As you can see I have made note to add in the required amount to the Bust, Waist and Hips. 

Make these adjustments as follows… …

adjust 2I have zoned the adjustments where possible, in this instance  both the Front and Side Front Panels are having 1cm added in to them. For this adjustment I can simply cut up the “Enlarge or Reduce” line, move the pieces 1cm away from each other then Sellotape on to some Pattern Paper in this position. 

For the Side, Side Back and Back Panels, I only need to adjust a portion so I will cut up the same line BUT leave a little bit un-cut at the end (Yellow Circles), as a pivot point. I can then move each side of each Panel away from each other as before but leave the Bust or Hips unaffected. Again, I shall Sellotape this adjustment on to a new piece of Pattern Paper.

As you may have noticed, I needed to adjust the Waist +3.5cm and I have only managed 3cm so far. This is not a real issue as- where the Green Crosses are- a slight adjustment has been made and as you can see each side has been moved a fraction because of this so I am happy that this is enough.

Obviously, when reducing the Corset the same techniques can be used but in reverse.

Adjustments to Corset Patterns are a funny business. Unlike when adjusting standard Patterns, the end product will alter the shape of you. If you find that you cannot manage to quite make an adjustment perfect do not stress yourself!! Smaller adjustments can be managed in the Fitting stage, simply make a note and have a cuppa.

Don’t forget that you can view the schedule for Corset Month here, grab your very own swanky copy of the Eventide Pattern here (PDFs are only £8!!), or grab some inspiration for your Corsetry with Corset Month on Pinterest.

Tomorrow, I shall be talking about handling fabric like Lace and Sequined Fabrics and cutting out your Corset! Eek!!

Happy stitching!