Sample Sale and New Products

At the end of the week I shall be releasing my much anticipated Corset Covers. At the same time I shall be running a Sample Sale of all of the pieces I have made for Laura After Midnight either as a way to figure out the Pattern, as an example to Photograph or pieces I have made for films.

  

Samples included a few Waistcoats- one of which has an amazing lining which legend has it was printed for the Rolling Stones in the 70s’!- a Steel Boned Victorian Bustle, a fantastic Fan Laced Victorian inspired Jacket (both from the below left Costume), a beautiful White Cotton Lawn Shirt and Petticoat and more. I’d love for them all to find homes!

costume waistcoat

Sizes are varied- some pieces will be able to be re-sized for an extra fee- some are a little rough and ready and others are gorgeous. I’m hoping to sell as much ex-stock as possible to make way for my new line of Vintage inspired Dresses, Corsets and other new designs.

I have an ulterior motive… money raised from this Sample Sale will go towards developing more Patterns. I have so many ideas! I want to release more Corset Patterns, as well as more underwear Patterns like Bustles and Corset Covers, and even start developing my own designs influenced by the Victorian era and my love of Costuming.

I will also be releasing new Spats Designs and the Spats Pattern and Kit in a few weeks time, Corsets, a new range of Vintage Party Dresses will première this Sunday and I shall be starting to print my own Fabric, so September promises to be a great month!

Throughout this time you can use Discount Code STEAMPUNK15 for 15% off of your order.

Happy stitching!

Draping a Victorian Bustle

As my Midnight Sewers’ Group wants to make Bustle Skirts next I have been digging around online & I’ve just stumbled across a wonderful illustration from Peterson’s Ladies National Magazine deconstructing how a bustle would have been draped.

As a Costume Designer & Maker, I find I can figure out fairly accurately from the illustrations, paintings & photographs of the period how to piece together a costume however; the Victorians really went to town with their drapery and it’s lovely to find an illustration which completely demystifies a little bit of this!

From http://pintuckstyle.blogspot.co.uk/ who also adds:

What you aren’t seeing here is that most successful bustles where draped on the bias, so that those front corner ‘points’ are probably right angles where the selvage & cross grain meet. The bustle pleating was similar to bunting, ruching up the fabric to create the necessary drapery.

Happy stitching!