The Midnight Atelier Skirt Making Book, a Stitch Bitch Companion!

So, this little number is now available in my Pattern Shop!

Front Coverpages pattern drafting skirt book

The Midnight Atelier Skirt Making Book, a Stitch Bitch Companion… a 36 page long, handmade and hand stitched little Pattern Making tome! Each includes instructions to Pattern Draft your very own A-Line Skirt… Choose to draw the Pattern straight on to the Fabric, or make one up in paper as also included are four separate Pattern adaptations to turn your original A-Line Skirt Pattern in to a Circle Skirt, Pleated Skirt, Tulip Skirt or Vintage style Pleated Circle Skirt! Wow!!

Available as a PDF or Hard Copy Print. Grab your copy today…

Happy stitching!

New Sewing Courses!

Phew! I have just finished updating the Class Schedule, and I have to say I am mighty proud of this one!

patternss  crochet club  machines

There’re Classes for beginners and more advanced Sewers alike, and I have tried to plan in fun projects like the Playsuit Course or Beginners Dressmaking Course which both have three different Patterns to choose from (and they’re all great, I promise!), as well as Project Days including an Introduction to Patchwork Day and the completely awesome and fun T-Shirt Project Day.

You guys who have already been stitching up a storm are also catered for and can choose from the Sew Anything Course– which starts soon!- as well as Lingerie, Corset and Vintage Pattern Courses. I’m almost envious, but I get to be there too, yay!

I also have a Social Media Training for Small Businesses Seminar which I am completely thrilled to be offering. I seem to spend a lot of time spouting off about how important SEO is, why I try to maintain an Editorial Calendar and why everyone with a Small Business should Blog in the first place, as well as blithering on about Internet Marketing and all the many minutiae of running a Small Business in this wondrous Internet age that I thought I would  share all of the bits and bobs I have learnt over the years to help y’all out!

Click here for more information but loosely this seminar will feature group discussion and worksheets plus handouts for future reference and is the perfect next step for your Small Business as you build your Brand and start to create more business through your website, shop and in person! It’s going to be such fun guys, I’m hopping with excitement!!

Places are limited by space so I’d book quick for all of the Courses and Classes.

Happy stitching!

Wordless Wednesday

This weeks Wordless Wednesday is of my own work! This is Maya from Borderlands 2… I’m pretty happy with my work and the Client loves it!!! 

Maya 4

Maya 3

Maya 5 Maya 2 Maya 1

In direct contravention of Wordless Wednesday rules I’m going to tell you a little about it!

Commissioned by a Client in Australia, this took me about twice as long as I thought because of the pieced nature of the ‘Body’. Yup, you may not have noticed but that baby is just shy of 50 pieces of individually patterned and cut Lycra, Satin and layered Lycra with Mesh. Yes, yes I am mad! In fact I’m so mad that, when the first wasn’t working… … I scrapped it and started another. I’m so pleased I did because this is a whole tonne better!

After patterning (using the Basic Bodice Block, then the Basic Swimwear Blocks with adaptations), I patterned the Costume as best I could using source material the Client had sent and looking at what other CosPlayers’ had managed. Because this is from a Game, I noticed that the illustration took a few liberties with reality to I had to adjust parts! Once Patterned, the pieces were cut and sewn together using my Dress Form to cope with the pieces… I’m not going to lie, a few were almost sewn on upside down because it is so complicated!

The Trousers were the easiest part, and once everything was made I got to break it down and make it dirty! I love that part!!

Everyone who has popped their head around The Midnight Atelier’s doors has gotten a peek in the last few months and I was enormously pleased with the compliments. Mainly because, as I am not a Gamer myself, I was worried it looked ok!

I have to say that I think this takes place of the 17th Century Wedding Dress I created- and had to put a bullet hole in to!- as my favourite Costume I have ever made. It’s just so unusual and uses one of my best skills- Pattern Drafting.

I am sure I shall be sharing a few more pictures of the creative process soon, but for now I though you’d like to see the sort of thing you can Commission from me! Up next are two stunning Edwardian Skirts for a Client in America! Yay!!

Happy stitching!

Notions: Make a super useful Tote Bag!

It’s been so long since I posted a Tutorial, I thought I’d finally post this super duper useful Tutorial for a Tote Bag. I taught it as a one off Class recently, and it’s a great make if you are learning how to use your Sewing Machine. You can make them up as gifts, or just to have ready to go shopping with!

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You will need:
Pattern Paper, Patternmaster or Ruler, Pencil and Pins.

A 20cm Zip, 1.5m of Cotton Tape for the Handles, one 1.5cm Button.

Fabric Requirements:

For the Pocket:
2x 5cmx6cm Zip Tabs
1x 25cm x 10cm piece for the Top Pocket
1x 25cm x 30cm piece for the Botton Pocket

For the Bag:
2x 35cm x 50cm pieces for the Bag Front and Bag Back

To make:

 2 3

Open the Zip up half way. Take the Zip Tabs and Pin each end of the Zip, with Right Sides Together as illustrated. Make sure that you Pin the open ends of the Zip close together neatly.

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With 3cm/just over 1″ Seam Allowance (and feel free to draw this on as I have) sew over each end. Remember to Reverse Stitch at the beginning and end to secure.

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8

Trim off the excess, then smooth out so both the Zip and the Zip Tab are Right Sides Up. Iron if possible to set.

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With Right Sides Together, Pin the Pocket Top to the Zip. Using your Sewing Machines Zipper Foot, sew along the Zip as illustrated. If you are worried about Sewing too far away- or too close!- use a Pencil to draw alongside the Zip to mark a line to follow. Remember to reverse stitch at the beginning and end.

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Fold out, so all Right sides are Up, and Iron to set and repeat for the Bottom  of the Pocket.

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Again using the Zipper Foot, you can choose to Top Stitch alongside the Zip on the Right Side. You may also choose to sew a Decorative Stitch however; you will need to remember to attach your normal Machine Foot to do this!

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Iron everything again so it is nice and flat, then turn under each side of the Pocket 1cm/ 3/8″ towards the back and Pin. Repeat for all four sides of the Pocket, then position the Pocket on the Front of the Bag and use the same Pins to Pin the Pocket on to the Bag.

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Starting on one side, and using the Zipper Foot again, Top Stitch the Pocket all the way around. To turn the corner, Roll the Needle in to the Fabric, lift the Top Foot up, and spin the Fabric as for the Patch Pocket Tutorial. Voilà, a pocket is born!

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Next, attach your Standard Machine Foot and turn the Top of the Front and Back of the Bag over 1cm, Pin and Iron. then, turn both over 2cm, and use the same Pins to Pin and then Iron again. Sew along to hem as illustrated. You may choose to use a straight stitch however; you can also use a Decorative Sticth if you wish.

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With Right sides Together, Pin the Front of the Bag to the Back of the Bag and, using a 1.5cm/5/8″ Seam Allowance Sew them together. Turn the Corners as before. Once you have sewn them, set your Sewing Machine to a medium wide Zig Zag Stitch and, with the edge of the Fabric running through the middle of the Foot, Zig Zag along the edge as illustrated. This will neatly bind the edge of the Seam so it doesn’t fray.

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Fold the Top of the Bag in half, and Mark with a Pin. Measure 1cm either side of the Pin and mark with a Pencil. Following your Sewing Machine’s instruction manual, make a Button Hole in between the Top of the Bag and the Stitching as illustrated. Cut the Button Hole open and lay the Bag flat. Mark through the middle of the Button Hole to the other side, then sew on your Button.

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Measure in 10cm/4″ from the Top edge of the Bag, and mark with a Pin. on either side. Pin the Handles ‘upside down’, and about 1cm from the Top edge. Sew along the Handle, in line with the stitching used to Hem the Top of the Bag, as illustrated. Even though it is such a little Seam, remember to Reverse Stitch at the beginning and end so the Handle is Sewn on nice and strong. Clip and trim all Threads.

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Fold the Handles up, and Pin. Sew along them again, remembering to Reverse Stitch at the beginning and end, but this time do so close to the top.
Clip and trim all loose threads, and you are ready to wrap up or go shopping with this lovely and incredibly useful ToteBag!

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Happy stitching!

Notes from the Atelier

Well, I have completed the move from Midnight Heights to Midnight Atelier, and a very happy Seamstress I am too!

I have already taught my first one-to-one Class in the space (more on that soon), which seems to work very well, and today was my first day of work… and boy did I work!

Orders were stitched, packed up and shipped. New designs patterned and sewn up, including the below- quite frankly- stunning Waspy Bustle Skirt and tidying and sorting continued apace!

bustle skirt 1 bustle skirt 3 bustle skirt 4 bustle skirt 5

bustle skirt 6 bustle skirt 7

This Bustle Skirt will be on sale next week and is one of two Bustle Skirt Designs I have been working on. Adapted from a Vintage Pattern, I am quite literally in love with it! I may have to make a Mini Tricorn Hat to match… I am also loving my new Labels… printed Purple Satin Ribbon, with a flourish of Vintage Taffeta behind. So much fun!!

Corset Month will continue Monday, which will also be the day I release my Course List for the Midnight Atelier and Workshop. Courses will include Vintage Lingerie, Corsetry and Bullet Bra making! Places are limited to just three lucky Sewers so booking early will be encouraged.

Happy stitching!

Week 2: Inserting the Busk Pt II

So, having perfectly inserted the Right side of our Busks in to our Eventide Corsets, today I shall be showing you how to insert the Left.

I think this is a little simpler than the Right, but should still be sewn with care. You will need your Awl for this bit.

Place the Left hand side of the Front Corset panels Right Sides Together and draw a line 2.5cm from the Front as illustrated. Again, using a Patternmaster will make this easier.

Sew along the line, remembering to reverse stitch at the beginning and end of the seam. Iron, with the Seams out and then roll the Front Fabric  around to the Back as you did for the Right hand side so that no Coutil can be seen from the Front. Pin.

Stitch a 5mm (or half a centimetre) seam along this Front edge- shown below right- this line is now our Centre Front Line of the Corset. You may need to attach the Zipper Foot to your Sewing Machine to see where you are sewing a little more clearly.

busk2 1 busk2 3

Place the Right side, over the Left side, and in line with the Seam you have just stitched (below left). Using a Fabric Pencil mark through the holes of the Busk Hooks… if your fabric is highly patterned you may need to use pins. Mark- or pin- at the far edge of the Busk Hook as illustrated.

Take away the Right hand side of the Corset.

busk2 4 busk2 6

Next, you will need your Awl. On the mark, push the Awl through the two Fabric layers- NOT the Coutil layers- until a hole has formed.

The aim is to gently push a hole and not snap any of the threads of the Fabric, as this will keep the structural integrity of the Fabric. If a hole is punched, or many threads snapped, when the Corset is worn and the Fabric put under stress the hole will rip larger and look incredibly messy.

When you have made a hole, from the back push the correct Busk Post through (the two together should be at the bottom as for the Right side of the Busk). This needs to be done gently so as to not damage the Fabric.

busk2 7 busk2 8

When all of the Busk Posts have been pushed through (below left), pin the Busk hard in as you did for the Right hand side of the Busk.

Attach the Zipper Foot to your Sewing Machine, measure the Seam Allowance and make a mark on your Sewing Machine as you did before.

Stitch along the edge of the Busk from top to bottom of the Corset panel (below right).

busk2 9 busk2 10

Easy as pie, right? And look… it’s a Corset Front! So pretty… …

busk2 12

So, it’s not all that difficult. Just remember to stitch nice and close to the Busk so it is held in nice and tight- not baggy! Remember also that it can be unpicked at any moment if you are unhappy.

At this point you may find your Fabric has ‘stepped’ or mis-aligned. Do not worry about this too much. It can be trimmed at the end of the sewing up process and is quite common as the Corset is sewn up. In fact, the Eventide Pattern has been made a little longer than necessary for this very reason.

Join me again tomorrow next week as we start to stitch the Corset up, and fit it to your figure. Also watch this space for a cheeky little Book Review of one of my favourite Corset Books and more Sewing Tips.

Don’t forget, the Eventide Corset Pattern is available in a number of options including Instant Download here, and you can join in with Corset Month on FacebookTwitter (#corsetsessions) and Pinterest!

Happy stitching!

Week 2: Inserting the Busk

So, today we’ll be seeing how to insert a Busk in to our Eventide Corsets! I love this bit of Corsetry, it’s when the Corset starts to look, well… like a Corset! It is also the first time we will be sewing with metal, which whilst not difficult, has it’s own set of rules.

The most important thing to remember is that your Sewing Machine is perfectly capable of sewing over the metal however; the Needle is not! I have clipped the edge of the Busk or Boning many times and the Needle not only breaks, it can fracture into small pieces which is not fun! It with damage the Fabric and invariable flies towards your face…

Firstly, you will need to select the Right hand Fabric and Coutil sections AS YOU WOULD WEAR THEM. To do this, lay the Fabric out, upside down as illustrated. With Right Sides Together, lay the Coutil on top then put the Left hand side to one side.

busk1 busk2

On the Coutil side, draw a line 3cm away from the edge. As you can see from the Pattern, this is the Centre Front Line. If you have a Patternmaster this will be super easy as you can line up the 3cm line and simply draw down as illustrated.

busk3 busk4 busk5

Place the Busk against this line, equidistant from the top and bottom, then draw either side of the Hooks. The two Hooks together go at the Bottom of the Busk, and the Busk should be laying as illustrated- with the Hooks against the Centre Front line.

 busk6 busk6a

After you have marked either side of the Hooks, Pin the layers together. On the Sewing Machine, sew in between the gaps (as shown below, far left with a pink dotted line) remembering to reverse stitch at the beginning and end of each little seam. Try not to stitch too far in to the gaps or the Busk Hooks will not fit through.

busk7 busk8 busk9

Don’t also forget that you can unpick at any moment if you are unhappy with the stitching.

Once happy, iron the Seam as follows… Iron the Seam out on the wrong side (below left), then wrap the Front around to the back so that on the Coutil side you can see a little of the Front fabric (below right) but none of the Coutil on the Right side.

busk10 busk11

Push the Busks Hooks through the holes, then push the Busk up against the Seam and hold firmly in place whilst pinning. The Busk needs to be hard up against the edge so that, when sewn, it is not baggy. A baggy Busk simply wont do!

Push the Pin in, then scrape the Pin along the back of the Coutil until you can feel the edge of the Busk, then pin through. Pinning like this will make sure the Pins hold the Busk in place nice and tightly.

busk12 busk13

When pinned, measure in from the edge of the Busk as as illustrated then, on the Sewing Machine, raise the Presser Foot and roll the Needle into the Machine. Place the measuring tape against the Needle, and use a Pencil to mark the Seam Allowance needed to stitch alongside the Busk.

Doing this makes sure that, above and below the Busk, you are able to sew in a neat line that is the same distance from the edge for the whole length. Marking with a Pencil means that you will be able to rub it off, alternatively you can use Washi Tape.

busk14 busk15

When you have you Seam Allowance marked, stitch along the side of the Busk from top to bottom. You will need to attach your Zipper Foot to do this. Because the Busk starts and finishes 5 or 6cm after the start or before the end your Seam Allowance mark will come in handy to guide you in a straight line to sew next to the Busk.

busk16 busk17

Voila! One beautifully inserted Busk!!

How easy was that? Join me tomorrow as I continue Corset Month with how to insert the Left side of the Busk.

Don’t forget, the Eventide Corset Pattern is available in a number of options including Instant Download here, and you can join in with Corset Month on FacebookTwitter (#corsetsessions) and Pinterest!

Happy stitching!

Week 2: Cutting the Eventide Corset out

Now, after a week of taking it easy it’s time to get stitching your Eventide Corset!

After having made any adaptations to fit on the Pattern, you’ll need to cut out the Fabric. Diagrams and more information can be found in the Eventide Instruction Book however; here are a couple of hints… … and dire warnings!

cut1 cut2

After having traced off, adapted and cut out the Pattern, pin to the Fabric remembering to measure the Grain Line. Fold the Coutil in half, Selvedge to Selvedge and Right Sides Together (so you are pinning to the back of your Fabric), and lay it on a flat surface.

It is incredibly important that each piece of the Pattern is cut out ON GRAIN. The Grain runs parallel to the Selvedge, which is the woven, finished edge of the Fabric. Cross Grain, or Bias, runs at a 45 degree angle to the straight Grain. Corsets must be cut out DIRECTLY ON THE STRAIGHT GRAIN to ensure the Waist Line in particular maintains the strength provided by the Straight Grain. Cutting the pieces of the Corset even slightly ‘off grain’ will mean it will twist uncomfortably as you wear it.

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Now, dire warnings aside!, after you have pinned each Pattern piece you will need to draw on your Seam Allowance… which is 1.5cm.

To do this, use a Tape Measure to measure out 1.5cm from the Pattern piece, and mark with some Tailors Chalk or a Fabric Pencil in a contrast colour. As you can see, Tailors Chalk is available in a variety of colours and it is useful to have a selection. Continue around each Pattern piece, measuring out and making a mark every few centimetres or so. Use a ruler or Patternmaster to connect the dots.

cut5 cut6 cut7

Cut each piece out, and before you un-pin it, make a little snip no more then 1cm deep at the Waist Line. This is called a notch and will assist you in sewing the Corset up. It is another important little detail!

Repeat for the Coutil.

cutting diagram

You may have noticed that each piece looks similar to the next, and you can choose to cut out some paper markers to Pin on to each piece. To do this simply write what the piece is on a little scrap of paper and pin to the piece BUT pin to the piece as you would WEAR it. To do this, lay the pieces out upside down so the top is closest to you.

And that’s it!

Don’t forget, the Eventide Corset Pattern is available in a number of options including Instant Download here, and you can join in with Corset Month on FacebookTwitter (#corsetsessions) and Pinterest!

Happy stitching!

Notions: Preparing to Sew with Difficult Fabric

For this weeks’ Notions, I thought I would discuss something which, whilst being relevant to Corsetry, is also good basic knowledge for using unusual fabrics for all types of projects.

There comes a time when we all would like to use something a little more adventurous! Preparing the Fabric well is half the task of sewing Lace, or Sequinned Fabric.

Lace Overlays

When using Lace for Corsets, you will need to consider the pattern of the Lace- is it large or small and do you need to take this into consideration when placing the Pattern Pieces? You will need to re-trace off your Corset Pattern (from your adapted Pattern) and add in Seam Allowance before cutting out. This will ensure you do not have to draw the Seam Allowance on to the Lace which can be difficult for a number of reasons- the Lace will move about and can stretch out of shape, it will also be delicate and should not be overly handled.

After tracing the Paper Pattern off, pin the Paper Pattern on and cut out as you would Fabric. If the lace is very delicate, you may wish to use Pattern Weights instead of Pins to ensure you do not damage the Lace. I do not worry about being overly accurate- as long as the Lace is cut out within 1cm of the edge of the Paper Pattern and all Waist Notches are marked you will be fine.

Once all Lace sections are cut out, lay the Fabric pieces of the Corset out, then lay the Lace sections on top. Double check your Waist Notches are all in line throughout the Corset pieces, and that you have a left and a right of each piece.

sequin 1sequin 2

Pin the layers together, pin carefully so as to not damage the Lace.

Tack each section together as illustrated. Use a contrast Tacking Thread, and try to keep within the 1.5cm Seam Allowance so you will not have to remove it. If, when the Corset is sewn up, you can see the Tacking Stitches, the contrast thread will help you to see where to remove them.

Once the pieces are tacked, you can trim back any excess Lace to the edge of the Fabric.

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Alternatively, and you may wish to Sew a couple Corsets having tacked them before trying this method!- you can pin the sections together as illustrated. Pin along the Seam Allowance as shown, and keep the Pins in until they are stitched up. Of course, whilst this method is quicker there are some obvious drawbacks! If you have to adjust the Corset or unpick it for any reason, these pieces will become separated and need to be pinned again, it will take a little more experience to be able to control the layers of fabric with just pins holding them together… you also use a lot of pins!!

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This is a technique I often use when manufacturing multiple Corsets.

Sequinned and Beaded Fabrics

Sewing with Sequinned and Beaded fabrics has another set of rules. Because you are unable to Sew over Beads or heavier weight Sequins, you will need to remove them from the Seam Allowance.

It is easiest to trace off the Pattern, and add the Seam Allowance as for working with Lace Fabrics before pinning in the Pattern and cutting out.

Using a Tape Measure, measure in 1.5cm (which is the Seam Allowance for the Eventide Corset Pattern) and mark with a line of Pins as illustrated.

beaded 1 beaded 2

With a contrast Thread, tack along the line of Pins.

beaded 3 beaded 4

When you have tacked a line of stitching 1.5cm in, you will need to remove all of the Beads and Sequins from the Seam Allowance. And yes, this takes ages!! I keep the Beads and Sequins I remove, in case I need to add a couple in again. The stitching which holds on the Beads or Sequins is actually a chain so sometimes a couple of centimetres can unravel when it is cut, and will need to be carefully sewn back down, or added in by hand.

I will insert the Busk by hand if I am making a Corset from Beaded Fabric so as to not disturb the pattern of the Beading at the front of the Corset.

Pattern Matching and using Patterned Fabrics

This tip for Pattern Matching Fabrics is enormously helpful however; if you are using a Patterned Fabric you may wish to select the sections you wish to use, or even Pattern Match the Front Panels so that the Pattern runs across them. This isn’t too difficult BUT please do try to remember to cut out a LEFT and a RIGHT of each Panel!! For this you will need to flip the Pattern Piece over.

pattern matchAs illustrated above, I have chosen which piece of the Pattern I would like to run down the front of the Corset. Folding the Pattern Piece back along the Centre Front line, I have matched it so that- when the Corset is sewn together- the Cyclist will pedal across the Bust!

Remember to fold the Pattern Back along the Centre Front line, then match on the Fabric. As you Pin the Pattern Piece on to the Fabric you can un-fold it and pin it down.

Matching along the Centre Front line is incredibly important because- and you’ll see this from the Instruction Book– the Fabric beyond the Centre Front is used as a Seam Allowance when inserting the Busk, so any pattern will be lost.

By the way, this awesome Fabric is available from Spoonflower, and I may just have to snap up a bit!

Don’t forget, the Eventide Corset Pattern is available in a number of options including Instant Download here, and you can join in with Corset Month on FacebookTwitter (#corsetsessions) and Pinterest!

Happy stitching!

Week 1: Adjusting the Eventide Corset Pattern to Fit

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Detailed instructions are given in the Eventide Corset Instruction Book however; I’d like to expand them a little with this Re-sizing Patterns to Fit post.

Although I am obviously doing this for the Eventide Corset Pattern, the basic principles apply when adjusting all Patterns to Fit your figure. I will admit that this technique will only get you so far, and would like to stress that a Fitting it always a good idea (unless you have a decade of experience like me!). A fitting will iron out all of the teeny tiny details and make any garment look oodles better however; the first step is to alter your Pattern to get a better approximation of your body than we currently have.

Firstly, take accurate measurements of your Bust, Waist and Hips and make a note of them. Reduce the measurements according to the instructions (roughly 10cm, but this is explained in greater detail in the Instruction Book), and make a note of this also.

With the reduced set of measurements, decide which Size is closest to yours. For example, the reduced measurements I am going to be working with are Bust 114cm, Waist 89cm and Hips 122cm which are closest to a Medium Size of the Eventide Corset Pattern. 

Once decided, cut or trace off the Size you wish to make (tracing off ensures you can re-use the Pattern, or have it to refer to if you make any mistakes).

Now the Maths bit… and yes, I heard you groan!

You will need to decide how much you need to add or take away from the Pattern to make it fit you, and in which areas. To do this you will need to subtract the Corset Pattern measurements from yours, then divide them in half. For example… my Bust measurement is 114cm which is 7cm larger than the Pattern Divided in half this is 3.5cm, which is what I need to add in to the Pattern to make it fit.

Repeat for the Waist and Hip measurements. I now know at this point that I need to add in 3.5cm to the Bust, 3cm to the Waist and 5cm to the Hips. You may be asking why we are further complicating things by dividing everything in half… this is because we will be working from the Pattern which is only half of you!

After all this Maths, you will need to start altering the Pattern. Again, there are complete instructions in the Eventide Corset Book however, this should explain things further.

Firstly, I lay all of the Pattern Pieces out in a line, with the Waist Line running parallel. I find this helps me visualize a little better what I am doing. Then, I make a note of where I would like to do the adjustments:adjust 1Normally, I would steer clear of adjusting the Front and Side Front Panels however, as I am making this Corset for a curvier Woman, I’d like to add in a little more room. They are also the narrowest Panels and I’d like to even this out a little for this Corset. As you can see I have made note to add in the required amount to the Bust, Waist and Hips. 

Make these adjustments as follows… …

adjust 2I have zoned the adjustments where possible, in this instance  both the Front and Side Front Panels are having 1cm added in to them. For this adjustment I can simply cut up the “Enlarge or Reduce” line, move the pieces 1cm away from each other then Sellotape on to some Pattern Paper in this position. 

For the Side, Side Back and Back Panels, I only need to adjust a portion so I will cut up the same line BUT leave a little bit un-cut at the end (Yellow Circles), as a pivot point. I can then move each side of each Panel away from each other as before but leave the Bust or Hips unaffected. Again, I shall Sellotape this adjustment on to a new piece of Pattern Paper.

As you may have noticed, I needed to adjust the Waist +3.5cm and I have only managed 3cm so far. This is not a real issue as- where the Green Crosses are- a slight adjustment has been made and as you can see each side has been moved a fraction because of this so I am happy that this is enough.

Obviously, when reducing the Corset the same techniques can be used but in reverse.

Adjustments to Corset Patterns are a funny business. Unlike when adjusting standard Patterns, the end product will alter the shape of you. If you find that you cannot manage to quite make an adjustment perfect do not stress yourself!! Smaller adjustments can be managed in the Fitting stage, simply make a note and have a cuppa.

Don’t forget that you can view the schedule for Corset Month here, grab your very own swanky copy of the Eventide Pattern here (PDFs are only £8!!), or grab some inspiration for your Corsetry with Corset Month on Pinterest.

Tomorrow, I shall be talking about handling fabric like Lace and Sequined Fabrics and cutting out your Corset! Eek!!

Happy stitching!